hydraulic fitting

Another Reason For Noise In Your System That Can Give You Problems

There is another intermittent and problematic source of noise in hydraulic systems – decompression.

This problem arises because hydraulic oil is NOT incompressible. The ratio of a fluid’s decrease in volume as a result of increase in pressure is given by its bulk modulus of elasticity.

The bulk modulus for hydrocarbon-based hydraulic fluids is approximately 250,000 PSI, (17,240 bar) which results in a volume change of around 0.4% per 1,000 PSI (70 bar).

When the change in volume exceeds 10 cubic inches (160 cubic centimeters) decompression must be controlled.

The compression of hydraulic fluid results in storage of energy, similar to the potential energy stored in a compressed spring. Like a compressed spring, compressed fluid has the ability to do work.

If decompression is not controlled, the stored energy dissipates instantaneously. This sudden release of energy accelerates the fluid, which does work on anything in its path.

Uncontrolled decompression stresses hydraulic hose, pipe and fittings. It creates noise and can cause pressure transients that can damage hydraulic components.

Decompression is an inherent problem in hydraulic presses for example, due to the large volume cylinders operating at high pressures.

Although hydrocarbon-based hydraulic fluids compress 0.4% – 0.5% by volume per 1,000 PSI, in actual application it is wise to calculate compression at 1% per 1,000 PSI. This compensates for the elasticity of the cylinder and conductors and a possible increase in the volume of air entrained in the fluid.

For example, if the combined captive volume of the hydraulic cylinder and conductors on a press was 10 gallons and operating pressure was 5,000 PSI, the volume of compressed fluid would be 0.5 gallons (10 x 0.01 x 5).

This equates to potential energy of around 33,000 watt-seconds. If the release of this amount of energy is not controlled, you can expect to hear a bang!

Decompression is controlled by converting the potential energy of the compressed fluid into heat. This is achieved by metering the compressed volume of fluid across an orifice.  

 

Craig Cook

Fitting Selection: The Key to Leak-Free Hydraulic Plumbing

Reliable Connections  

Leak-free reliability begins at the design stage, when the type of hydraulic fitting is selected for port, tube-end, and hose-end connections.  

Ports 

Connectors that incorporate an elastomeric seal such as UNO, BSPP, and SAE 4-bolt flange offer the highest seal reliability. NPT is the least reliable type of connector for high-pressure hydraulic systems because the thread itself provides a leak path. The threads are deformed when tightened and, as a result, any subsequent loosening or tightening increases the potential for leaks. In existing systems, pipe thread connections should be replaced with UNO or BSPP for leak-free reliability.  

Tube and Hose Ends 

ORFS tube and hose end connections feature the high seal reliability afforded by an elastomeric seal, but due to its cost, ORFS is not as widely used as compression fittings and JIC 37-degree flare.  

Flared connections have gained widespread acceptance due to their simplicity and low cost. However, the metal-to-metal seal of the flare means that a permanent, leak-free joint is not always achieved, particularly in the case of tube-end connections.  

Leaking flare joints can be eliminated using a purpose-built seal developed by Flaretite. The Flaretite seal is a stainless steel stamping shaped like a JIC nose, with concentric ribs that contain pre-applied sealant. When tightened, the ribs crush between the two faces of the joint, eliminating any misalignment and surface imperfections. The combination of the crush on the ribs and the sealant ensure that a leak-free joint is achieved.  

Incorrect Torque  

A common cause of leaks from flare joints is incorrect torque. Insufficient torque results in inadequate seat contact, while excessive torque can result in damage to the tube and fitting through cold working. The following is a simple method to ensure flare joints are correctly torqued:

  1. Finger tighten the nut until it bottoms on the seat.
  2. Using a permanent marker, draw a line lengthwise across the nut and fitting.
  3. Wrench tighten the nut until it has been rotated the number of hex flats listed in the following table:

torque chart for flare joints 

Vibration

Vibration can stress plumbing, affecting hydraulic fitting torque and causing fatigue. Tube is more susceptible than hose. If vibration is excessive, the root cause should be addressed. Ensure all conductors are adequately supported and if necessary, replace problematic tubes with hose.  

Seal Damage

Having outlined the benefits of hydraulic fittings that incorporate an elastomeric seal, it is important to note that their reliability is contingent on fluid temperature being maintained within acceptable limits. A single over-temperature event of sufficient magnitude can damage all the seals in a hydraulic system, resulting in numerous leaks.

A leak-free hydraulic system should be considered the norm for modern hydraulic machines – not the exception. But the proper selection, installation and maintenance of hydraulic plumbing are essential to ensure leak-free reliability.

Craig Cook

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